Industry News
Almost all Minnesota landowners required to put in 50-foot buffers along rivers and other public waters have installed them or are in the process of doing it as the Nov. 1 deadline approaches.
With increasing demand from its customers to bring quality drainage pipe to the north central Iowa area, Springfield Plastics, Inc. (SPI) is proud to announce it will open a new pipe yard in Humboldt, Iowa in late fall.
Keynote Speaker, Doug Dvorak will speak on business ethics at the LICA winter convention on Friday, February 23 in Charleston, SC.
An Iowa State University research project has found that prairies, known for an abundance of deep roots, don't interfere with tile drainage systems running under them.
The United States Department of Agriculture will fund $7.6 million worth of improvements to two Arkansas watershed districts to help reduce flooding of cropland and grazing land, as well as improve water quality.
Springfield Plastics looks to raise money to support cancer research at the Simmons Cancer Institute at Southern Illinois University in Springfield. The company first launched the "Drain for the Cure" campaign in 2014 and have continued to raise more than $114,000.
The Midshore Riverkeeper Conservancy was recently awarded a grant of $451,960 from the National Fish and Wildlife Foundation Chesapeake Bay Stewardship Fund with the aim of increasing agricultural conservation in the area.
Drainage districts, once the target of a Des Moines Water Works lawsuit, could be part of the solution to cut high nitrate levels in Iowa's lakes, rivers and streams, according to a new report.
A retired BYU professor and Utah Lake expert recently dropped a water bomb on a legislative committee, imploring lawmakers to put a halt to upgrades at sewage plants to tackle nutrient pollution.
Researchers in Minnesota are fine-tuning ways to rid field runoff of unwanted nutrients before they hit lakes and streams by creating a next generation bioreactor.
As the prevalence of smart phones and tablets continues to grow, mobile technology is also becoming an emerging tool in the fight to reduce farm nutrient runoff, which causes Lake Erie's harmful algal blooms.
The algae bloom in nearby Lake Erie has made phosphorous reduction a key priority, according to Katie Stammler, Water Quality Scientist with the Essex Region Conservation Authority. She credits local cash crop farmer Henry Denotter with helping to bring a Priority Subwatershed Project (PSP) to the Wigle Creek area.
In Alberta, tile drainage systems — like all drainage or water diversions — are regulated under the Water Act and enforced by Alberta Environment and Parks, which classifies water bodies according to their permanence as well as specific soil and vegetation characteristics.
The Foundation for Agronomic Research (FAR) has been selected to receive a $1 million research grant from the Foundation for Food and Agriculture (FFAR) to study the impact suites of 4R Nutrient Stewardship practices have on the movement of nutrients in corn and soybean cropping systems. The grant is matched with $1 million in funds from the 4R Research Fund.
In parts of northeastern Saskatchewan, excess moisture and high water tables have prevented some growers from seeding certain fields in the Melfort area over the past few years. Water table levels have been monitored in the area since an observation well was installed in 1967, with the highest levels ever recorded in 2014. Water levels declined consistently from the mid-1970s until 2004, when they began to rise significantly through 2014. With the high cost of cropland, growers can't afford to not crop all of their acres. | READ MORE

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