Industry News
The Vermont Agency of Agriculture, Food and Markets held a public hearing on March 30 to receive feedback on a new set of tile drainage rules currently being drafted by the state agency to try to mitigate runoff. | READ MORE
For many farmers, it was easy to spend money on drainage tile five years ago when profits were rolling in. What about now? As Farm Futures reports, investing in tile may be an even smarter expense these days, as long as it's being installed where it’s needed — and especially with weather extremes playing havoc on spring planting. | READ MORE
The Minnesota Agricultural Water Resource Center (MAWRC) has responded to the Minnesota Star Tribune columnist who claimed that unregulated drainage is putting the state's wetlands at risk. Warren Formo, executive director of MAWRC, submitted a response to the column on March 26, noting that the state is one of few that have wetland regulations at the state level, and "only after it is determined that there are no wetland impacts, or any unavoidable wetland impacts are being mitigated through the creation of replacement wetlands, is the [drainage] project allowed to proceed." 
Pattern tiling – the practice of laying drain tile in positions designed to move water as quickly as possible – is a common, yet unregulated, process in Minnesota, and in the opinion of some, it is hurting the states natural resources. | READ MORE
March 22 is World Water Day. Designated by the United Nations, the day is about focusing attention on the importance of water in our daily lives and on a global scale. 
When an Indiana farmer let rye grow longer than usual in some fields so he could bale it for straw before planting corn, he found dead roots were plugging the tile. Though fixing the tile isn't fun, he says it's not enough of a problem to scare him away. | READ MORE
Ontario is helping Thunder Bay area farmers improve their agricultural land, diversify crops and expand their businesses.
Eastern mudsnails live in coastal areas from Nova Scotia to Georgia. In many of these areas, human activities have brought large amounts of nitrogen to coastal habitats.
The Thames River Phosphorus Reduction Collaborative (PRC) is moving into the next phase in developing practical ways to reduce the amount of phosphorus getting into local waterways from agricultural and municipal drains.
The Vermont Agency of Agriculture, Food & Markets (VAAFM) filed a proposed amendment to the Required Agricultural Practices (RAPs) Rule with the Vermont Secretary of State.
When Carol Platt received her 2018 tax assessments, she thought there was some mistake.
Farmers help drive economic growth in Canada, but they can also face risks that threaten the viability of their farms, such as unpredictable weather. The Government of Canada is committed to working with the sector to explore and develop new risk management tools that meet the needs of Canadian farmers when faced with serious challenges beyond their control.
The Land Improvement Contractors of Ontario (LICO) met recently in London, ON for their 60th anniversary convention.
Jerry Biuso, CEO of the Land Improvement Contractors Association, has focused on building up the membership of the organization that represents earthmoving contractors, from farm drainage contractors to landscaping contractors and quarry contractors.
Producers, landowners, consultants, drainage contractors, government agency staff, water resource managers and others interested in subsurface drainage and water table management systems will have an opportunity to learn more at a one-day tile drainage design workshop March 7 in Fargo, N.D.

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