Industry News
Sept. 23, 2013, Mitchell, S.D. — With land prices in South Dakota as high as $6,000 per acre, farmers are out to wring every dollar they can from their fields. For many, that means installing drain tile, one contractor told Agweek.com. | READ MORE
Sept. 23, 2013 – Drainage Contractor is celebrating its 40th anniversary, and to celebrate, we're reminiscing with stories that have been published in our pages over the last 40 years. This week's article, written by (then associate editor) Elinor Humphries, was published in the 1990 issue of Agri-BookMagazine/Drainage Contractor. In the article, Humphries explores the steps the Michigan chapter of the Land Improvement Contractors of America took to monitor water quality. 
Sept. 19, 2013, West Fargo, N.D. – Common sense may suggest that tile drainage and irrigation won’t both be popular at the same time in the same region. But farmers in North Dakota's Red River Valley have strong interest in both tile drainage and irrigation, viewing the two as valuable “water management” tools, writes Inforum.com. | READ MORE
Sept. 5, 2013, South Dakota – Engineers at South Dakota State University are installing bioreactors on agricultural land in eastern South Dakota. By the end of 2013, five demonstration sites will be established showcasing these conservation drainage systems which are designed to reduce nitrates that may be in drainage waters. | READ MORE
Sept. 5, 2013, Ohio – Drought and excessive rainfall in Ohio have forced Amish farms to adapt and incorporate such technology as subsurface drainage, writes The Republic. | READ MORE
Aug. 29, 2013, Saskatchewan – The Saskatchewan government is asking citizens for their views on agricultural drainage through an online forum running from Sept. 1 through to March 31, 2014.The Water Security Agency is developing a new agricultural drainage policy and beginning the process of updating its regulatory approach to drainage. These activities will help to fulfill the commitments in the new 25 Year Saskatchewan Water Security Plan to: Develop a results-based drainage works approval process and associated enforcement strategy, and Develop new strategies to effectively address excessive moisture concerns on agricultural lands. Drainage has been of significant concern among many stakeholders including farmers, rural municipalities, and environmental organizations. New policy and regulations need to be developed to address issues such as licensing requirements, the effectiveness of drainage project success and the mitigation of risks such as downstream flooding, damage complaints and environmental impacts.An online community is an important part of the consultation on this policy and regulation development process. This community is an online public space where individuals can interact with each other, an Insightrix facilitator, and the Water Security Agency to discuss this important issue. The community will consider, discuss, and suggest the essential elements of agricultural drainage policy and regulation. In addition, Insightrix will conduct periodic surveys throughout the process to gauge participant opinion on a variety of questions. As such, the forum will provide the Water Security Agency with important information and insight as they develop new program, policy and regulatory approaches to drainage.This community will be open until March 31, 2014. Click here for more information.
Aug. 26, 2013 – Drainage Contractor magazine is celebrating its 40th anniversary in 2013, and we're taking a look back at what made the headlines 40 years ago with Forty-year flashback, a series of articles from the magazine's first few editions. The following article, originally published in the 1975 edition of the magazine, counters the thought that drainage is harmful to the Earth, and explains how it can benefit the environment.
Aug. 23, 2013, Indiana – A planned repair to a 131-year-old drain tile in northern Bartholomew County would cost some property owners tens of thousands of dollars, writes The Republic. | READ MORE
Aug. 22, 2013, Minnesota – A lawyer in Minnesota recently told producers that he sees troubling drainage issues emerging with the Natural Resources and Conservation Service, the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service and the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, writes the Tri-State Neighbor. | READ MORE
Aug. 15, 2013 – Springfield Plastics, Inc. will be exhibiting in booth #9408 in the Varied Industries Tent at the Farm Progress Show from Aug. 27 to 29 in Decatur, IL. Springfield Plastics, along with the Illinois Land Improvement Contractors Association (ILICA), will also be putting on a field demonstration of drainage pipe installation during the Farm Progress Show. 
Aug. 14, 2013, Palmyra, MO – Port Industries is hosting a Hydramaxx Ag Drainage Field Day on Aug. 20 and 21 in Palmyra, MO. Various trencher and plow models will be on display for field demonstrations. The open house will include field demonstrations and a tour of the manufacturing plant and Port's new office building. Click here for more information. 
Aug. 12, 2013 – Drainage Contractor magazine is celebrating its 40th anniversary in 2013, and we're taking a look back at what made the headlines 40 years ago with Forty-year flashback, a series of articles from the magazine's first few editions.
Aug. 12, 2013, New York – Scientists in New York are trying to figure out whether there’s a link between tile drainage and phosphorus pollution, writes InnovationTrail.com. | READ MORE
Aug. 6, 2013, South Dakota – Brian Smith, a South Dakota Farmer, discusses the benefits of subsurface drainage from a farmer's perspective in the Argus Leader. | READ MORE
Aug. 2, 2013, Batavia, N.Y. – Alleghany Farm Services hosted an open house yesterday to show farmers the benefits of improving field drainage, writes the Batavian. | READ MORE

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